All posts by Chicago Executive

Critters vs. the Hurricanes

When Hurricane Katrina hit the Louisiana Coast in the summer of 2005, it was then the strongest storm ever to strike the U.S. mainland. It displaced tens of thousands of people and thousands of animals in one fell swoop. Then came Irma last week to claim the top title and that, just a week after Hurricane Harvey had devastated the southeast coast of Texas and Louisiana separating more people from their animals. Of course the animals can’t ask for help.

For better or worse, pets become a part of people’s lives. That means they’re dependent upon us for many of their basic needs like food and shelter. Without us, their fate is pretty much sealed.

In an effort to help, the folks at Signature Flight Support PWK turned a corner of the station into the local hub for critter necessities under the watchful eye of Audrey Boehner.

If you’d like to help, you can drop off any of the items in most need. A cash donation at Signature’s front desk works too at their location on Tower Road just west of Milwaukee Ave. Donations are being accepted until October 7th when everything will be packed up and head to the PAWS facility in the Chicago for the trip south to where they’re desperately needed.

No tear-jerking music here, just a request to help if you’re someone who can.

The Most Needed Items:

Dog/cat food, Bottled water, Food bowls, Leashes & collars, Blankets & towels, Litter boxes, Dog treats & chew toys, Flea & tick spray, Dog shampoo, or cleaning supplies such as bleach, dish soap, trash bags, paper towels & laundry detergent. Signature’s open 24 hours each day, seven days a week. Ring Audrey at 847-537-1200 with your questions.

 

Collings Foundation Aircraft Depart to Rave Reviews

Collings Foundation Aircraft Depart to Rave Reviews

By the time the Collings Foundation’s squadron of aircraft departed PWK last week, they’d already made quite the impression on people both on and near the airport. The 2017 visit of the world-famous B-17, B-24, B-25 and P-51 this year drew nearly 3,000 visitors, many who waited in long lines in the hot sun just for a chance to get up close to the aircraft all hunkered down on the east side ramp. A few of the lucky ones went for rides aboard these vintage birds. The money taken in at the gate and to carry riders during the week all went back to the Collings Foundation, a 501(c) 3 educational foundation, to support the aircraft and the people who flew them.

Chicago Executive Airport and Signature Flight Support-PWK again supported the vintage airplanes during their visit July 26 to the 31st. Signature deeply discounted the fuel delivered to the 4-aircraft during the stay while the airport provided some of the safety support to keep people close to the airplanes and away from the runways.

The Signature folks said, “Thousands of aviation enthusiasts and their families came to tour and take a flight, bringing back memories for many former military people who were involved with these aircraft 70 years ago.”

Once the numbers were tabulated, the Signature people said some 2,850 people passed through the gate. About 216 visitors took a ride aboard one of the airplanes during one of the 41 separate flights, 16 for the P-51 and 25 for the B-17, B-24 and B-25. The P-51 carried one passenger while the B-25 carried six. The B-17 and the B-24 were each capable of carrying 10 passengers on each trip.

If you missed them this year, the Collings Foundation airplanes will be back in July 2018. Find more on the Collings Foundation here.

60 Years at PWK and Still Going Strong

Do You Know Lou Wipotnik?

There aren’t too many things around PWK that date back to 1957. The old timers still call it Pal-Waukee Airport and will probably never stop.

The airport’s original control tower built above hangar 4 in the 60s was torn down years ago and replaced by a more modern structure where controllers keep an eye on things from high above, just east of Signature Flight Support’s ramp. In the 50s, the only way for an airplane on the ground to reach Runway 16 for a south takeoff was to wait for a gap in traffic and scoot the opposite way up the runway for a quick turnaround. Back in the late 50s and early 1960s, student pilots were often seen practicing their landings and takeoffs on Runways 24 Left and 30 Left, surfaces turned into taxiways decades ago. In the airport’s busiest days of the late 1960s and early 1970s, takeoffs and landings often hovered between 200,000-225,000 each year. In 2016, airport traffic totaled about 79,000.

If you’ve been hanging around the airport for any length of time however, there’s one fellow you might have seen or perhaps even met … Lou Wipotnik. He first came to PWK in May of 1957 when he learned to fly at Sally’s Flying School on the east side of the airport. Don’t look for Sally’s though either … the place has been closed at least 30 years.

Lou earned his Flight Instructor rating in 1968 and has been teaching in airplanes & helicopters ever since, having worked at most of the schools on the airport at one time or another. He currently instructs with Fly There and Leading Edge Flying Club at hangar five on the west side of the field and flies as an independent instructor with aircraft owner pilots at PWK.

Lou was named the FAA’s U.S. Flight Instructor of the Year in 1996, as well as having reached the Master Flight Instructor Emeritus status in 2016. He certainly hasn’t been slowing down any, even after 60 years at PWK either. Lou was inducted into the Illinois Aviation Hall of Fame in May of last year.

A longtime member of the Chicago Airport Pilots Association, Lou served two terms as club President between 2001-2004 and has been active with the Civil Air Patrol for 32 years. Lou still teaches a variety of aviation safety seminars in the Chicagoland area as a FAASTeam Representative for the FAA FSDO #3.

“Lou is a go to guy for aviation education. He always replies in the affirmative if you need a speaker and has donated his time and effort over and over and over again. I remember especially his aviation club from before 1986 with regular tests to keep the pilots sharp and his great IFR presentations at the 99s Safety Seminar. So glad he’s shared his expertise with so many for so long and so well.  Congrats LOU on the first half of your career 😋.”

Madeleine Monaco, President, Chicago Executive Pilots Association

Noise Exposure Map Update & Open House

Noise Exposure Map Update Open House

Everyone’s invited to the airport’s public information Open House on June 29 to hear the latest updates about the Part 150 Noise Exposure Maps (NEM). The NEMs are used to generate the noise contour levels and establish best land use practices for all the airport’s runways. The FAA requires airports to update these NEMs every five years to analyze aircraft noise levels at the airport and over the surrounding communities.

The Open House begins at 6 pm and runs until 7:30 pm at Hangar 19, 1604 South Milwaukee Ave in Wheeling (directions below).

Airport staff and consultants from Mead & Hunt, the company updating the NEMs, will be on hand to answer your questions about aircraft noise and how the new NEMs might benefit the community. If you’re  unable to attend but have a question or comment you’d like included for the record, please e-mail them prior to the meeting to Jen Wolchansky at jennifer.wolchansky@meadhunt.com.

 

Directions: Hangar 19 is accessible from Milwaukee Ave on Tower Road. Additional related questions may be sent to the Airport Communications Office at rmark@chiexec.com

 

 

PWK Named Illinois 2017 Reliever Airport of the Year

Chicago Executive Named Reliever Airport of the Year

Wheeling IL, May 8, 2017 – The Illinois Department of Transportation last week named Chicago Executive Airport its 2017 Reliever Airport of the Year, confirming the airport’s critical role in the National Airspace System (NAS). Reliever airports were created decades ago in order to draw air traffic away from already congested airline hub airports such as Chicago O’Hare and Midway.

The DOT announcement highlighted a number of important criteria Chicago Executive was scored on during the competition with nearly a dozen other reliever airports around Illinois. Some of those include the airport’s safety record, airport service provided to the local community and general maintenance and upkeep of the airport itself.

Chicago Executive Airport earned the reliever airport of the year award a decade ago when the facility was still known by its old name Palwaukee Municipal Airport.

The DOT will officially hand the award to the airport’s Executive Director Jamie Abbott on May 25 during this year’s Illinois Aviation Conference in Champaign IL.

Chicago Executive Airport, located nine miles north of Chicago O’Hare International Airport, is jointly owned by the City of Prospect Heights and the Village of Wheeling. Airport governance includes input from a seven-member Board of Directors chosen from the two towns. More information about Chicago Executive Airport is available at chiexec.com.

Chicago Executive Airport’s EMAS System Earns Top Award

Chicago Executive Airport’s Safety System Earns Top Award

Some of you might recall an incident in January of last year when during an early morning arrival, a Falcon 20 cargo jet crew realized after touchdown on Runway 16 that they wouldn’t be able to halt their aircraft before the end of the runway. Landing to the south, Palatine Road runs east to west just off the airport’s property. Luckily for all involved, the airport had recently installed an Engineered Material Arresting System at both ends of the long runway. Landing to the south that morning, the Falcon ran into the EMAS system that safely stopped the airplane in just a few seconds with very little damage to the aircraft and zero injuries to anyone. That EMAS was installed because there was not enough flat surface available at either end of the runway to serve as the normal runway safety area demanded by the FAA.

That EMAS project, let by the airport’s engineering firm Crawford, Murphy & Tilly was recently honored with a Merit Award at ACEC Illinois’ annual Engineering Excellence Award banquet earlier this month.

The Chicago Executive Airport Runway Safety Area Improvement project demonstrated how engineering ingenuity can help an airport continue to thrive despite a tightly-constrained environment. Due to those space restrictions, CMT proposed, designed, and championed for both approval and funding for the EMAS that saved the day in January 2016. EMAS allowed the airport to improve the runway safety area without the need to use any additional real estate and without sacrificing the level of operations at the state’s third busiest airport.

CMT vice president Brian Welker said, “It’s certainly an honor for CMT, but I’m especially grateful that Chicago Executive Airport is being recognized for all the work they’ve done. They’ve been committed to improving their facility for many years now. PWK is an invaluable asset, both to the people and businesses who use the airport, and to the overall economy of the region.”

Nice job folks.

What Are Your Kids Doing This Summer?

If you have young people around your house, you probably know the number of summer jobs for kids continues to dwindle. The ones that do come along are often boring minimum wage positions too.

But what if your teenager was offered the chance to earn some money AND gather some valuable work experience … at well … an airport?

Here’s that big opportunity …Click here for details

 

Are You a Pilot or Even Just Interested?

The new year has brought us face to face with a number of great local events for pilots or folks thinking about learning to fly  … and even people who just find the idea of leaving the ground a fascinating idea. I forgot one other possibility … you’re the spouse or significant other of some poor soul addicted to things that fly.

The 99’s VFR/IFR Safety Seminar, Aviation Expo and Companion Flyers Course

First up is the 20th IFR/VFR Safety Seminar and Aviation Expo organized by the Chicago Chapter of the 99’s, the international organization of licensed women pilots. It happens Saturday January 28th at the Holiday Inn, 860 West Irving Park Road in Itasca. On-site registration begins at 8 am and sessions run until 3:30 pm. The event is broken down into interesting and practical talks aimed at both instrument rated pilots and those who are still dashing around in clear airspace beneath the clouds and away from poor weather. Best of all though, there’s a flying companion course for those people interested in learning more about what’s really happening in flight when they normally just sit patiently watching from the right seat. A dozen and a half different vendors will also be on hand who are all too happy to explain where their company fits into the aviation world.

Pre-registration is not needed and of course, the entire event is free of charge … although, I bet the local 99’s chapter folks would be grateful for any donation you might want to make on the 28th to help them fund great programs like this.

IMC Club Returns

The IMC Club returns to Chicago Executive Airport (PWK) beginning February 22 beginning at 6: 30 pm at the Ramada Plaza Hotel 1090 S. Milwaukee Ave (east side of the airport) in Wheeling. While the first meeting takes place at the Ramada, Club meeting locations will alternate between the hotel and Signature Flight Support. The IMC Club, now run by the EAA to promote the idea that instrument rated pilots are only at their best when they remain proficient. Each month, the IMC Club will meet to bring together instrument pilots and flight instructors for frank discussions to improve their understanding of how best to operate in the national airspace system though the myriad of IFR procedures that keep air traffic flowing smoothly, as well as how both new and old cockpit technologies support these efforts. The real benefit of the IMC Club sessions are those discussions that nearly everyone in the room seems to participate in. Pilots talk about some of the good and the bad IFR flights or issues they’ve personally experienced.

Starting next month, the Chicago Executive Pilots Association (CEPA) will begin serving as host organization for the IMC Club at PWK. More information about CEPA and the IMC Club is available from their website where you can also sign up for their monthly newsletter. Or of course, you could just bring yourself over to the Ramada where they should have the rest of the sessions figured out by Feb. 22.

The IMC Club is the brainchild of Radek Wyrzykowski, a master certified flight instructor-instrument and multiengine instructor who will be on hand for the Feb. 22nd meeting. He’ll be joined that night by air traffic control personnel from the Chicago TRACON to discuss proposed changes to MDW Charlie airspace, the ORD modernization program, local IFR and VFR routings and other interesting topics. In case you’re after a look-see at the IMC Club before next month’s local kickoff meeting, visit their online forum where you’ll be able to sample a bit of the chatter about people who fly in the clouds … or want to. For those of you who can’t live without Facebook, you’ll find the IMC Club has a page there too.

More information about the IMC Club as well as local CEPA events, they’re all listed in each month’s CEPA newsletter, so click and read. January 2017 CEPA Newsletter

If you find these events interesting, don’t keep them a secret … pass around our link. And don’t forget to visit chiexec.com and signup for our newsfeed to stay in touch with other events..

Some Christmas Advice to New Drone Operators

A Little Advice to New Drone Operators

Dear Drone Owner:

Welcome to the aviation industry. You’re not alone. The Inspector General of the U.S. Department of Transportation (IG) believes that when 2016 comes to an end in a few weeks, between 2 and 2.5 million new drones will have been sold in the United States. Adding in the million or so already flying, the result could well make for some pretty crowded airspace.

One area where we really don’t need any drones though, thank you very much, is in the airspace around airports like Chicago Executive, home to dozens of large business airplanes, as well as a variety of smaller personal aircraft. But that also means you need to avoid O’Hare and DuPage and Waukegan and even Schaumburg Airports. A collision between even a small drone and an airplane could lead to a disaster. We’re honestly not trying to scare folks, but we need to be realistic if we’re all going to start mixing up in the same airspace.

uasThe DOT worries about the same thing, because as the number of active drones increases, so too have the number of incidents involving these new aircraft appearing where they either aren’t expected or aren’t allowed. The DOT said earlier this month for instance, that in the past year, slightly more than two thirds of the of the reports of drones posing a potential risk to indicated they were flying above the 400-foot ceiling allowed by Part 107. Fully 29 percent were in-fact observed flying at altitudes above 3,000 feet AGL.

That’s not good for anyone, airports, aircraft pilots and passengers or drone operators. While we’re all having fun enjoying this new category of flying machine and will continue to do so in ways that probably haven’t even been thought of just yet, we thought it might be just the right time of the year to remind drone operators of a few safety issues to keep in mind once they take delivery of that new DJI Phantom or a UDI.

Building a Drone Community

First understand that everyone in the FAA, the aviation industry, as well as the drone manufacturing, training and operators groups want to see drones become a huge success now and in the future. There are simply too many important jobs ahead that are just right for drones because they can be operated more safely than an airplane or a helicopter, like when they’re inspecting pipelines or windmills. Drones can be programmed to depart base for an inspection routine in weather no pilot would fly in. The drone doesn’t think twice. Once the operator hits the engage button, the drone departs and returns only when the mission’s accomplished.

All we folks on the ground at airports and many of the surrounding communities care about is that the operator has given some thought to how the drone will make the trip back and forth from home. We hope you’ll remember than flying anywhere close to an airport – any airport – is a really bad idea. The closer a drone passes to an operating airport in fact, the greater the risk since aircraft are closer to the ground as they arrive and depart.

While the government is still wrestling with privacy issues, we hope you, the newest members of the drone community, something that also makes you a charter member of the aviation industry, will also think about the rules that ask you not to fly over groups of people, even if it looks cool. A half dozen people were arrested and lost their drones last month when they flew them over the millions of folks gathered in Chicago for the Cubs Worlds Series Party. Many of those operators never gave safety of flight much thought at all, probably only the incredible footage they’ve grab during the flight.

But drone operators must consider safety each and every time they fly … their own safety, as well as the safety of those around them, whether those other people are across the street or across town. Some reasons for considering the safety of others are obvious, but there’s another that few new drone owners will be thinking about.

All the industry needs is one significant accident somewhere along the way, just one, in which some thoughtless person decides to try something they shouldn’t, like flying to close to a group of people at a concert or too near an airplane heading in for a landing. One accident could ruin this budding industry, not just for some apathetic pilot, but for everyone else as well.

With that in mind, here are few items to consider should you find a drone under the tree this year, or if you’ve already brought one home. For information too, a drone is also known by a variety of names depending upon who the audience is, so get used to seeing the UAS, UAV and RPV acronyms. They all mean drone.

  1. Spend a few minutes and read “Getting Started,” on the FAA website.
  1. Check out this summary of Part 107, the FAA rule that explains drone operations.
  1. If your aircraft weights more than roughly eight ounces, you must register it with the FAA. That’s easy enough to do right here.
  1. You must be at least 16 years of age in order to register and fly a drone.
  1. Be aware that if you intend to use your drone commercially, you’ll need to earn the FAA’s new small-unmanned aircraft system certificate. Here’s what you’ll need to know.uas-certificate
  1. Never fly your drone near an airport, or over crowds of people you don’t know.
  2. Never fly your drone higher than 400 feet above the ground and remember you must always keep your drone in sight at all times.
  1. Finally, don’t forget to stop by our drone resource page from time to time for updates to drone operations. You can always subscribe too and we’ll send you info as it becomes current.

As we say in the flying business, fly safe always … and don’t forget to have fun.

 

Mr. Abbott Goes to Tokyo

Mr. Abbott Goes to Tokyo

jamie-tokyo

Jamie Abbott speaks to EMAS seminar audience in Tokyo last month

Late in September, Chicago Executive Airport Executive Director, Jamie Abbott, was invited to speak about EMAS, the engineered material arresting system installed on both ends of the airport longest runway 16/34. EMAS is designed to snag an airplane that normally might have run off the end of the runway, possibly spilling on to nearby highways. The airport’s EMAS was just installed last fall.

The seminar was organized to share information between an airport operator like PWK and a potential Zodiac Aerospace customer. Zodiac, the original designer of the EMAS, covered all travel expenses for Mr. Abbott’s trip. While this kind of invite normally wouldn’t raise anyone’s interest, this one did, because Zodiac’s customer was in Tokyo. In fact, the customer team was actually comprised of the Japan Civil Aeronautics Bureau, the Regional Civil Aeronautics Bureau, Narita International Airport and Japan Ministry of Defense. In all, about 50 people were in attendance. The team from Japan was trying to decide whether or not to install EMAS at Tokyo’s Narita International airport.

EMAS Falcon

Falcon 20 resting in the EMAS bed at the south end of the airport last January

EMAS is constructed of light concrete bricks that crumble beneath the weight of an aircraft, quickly slowing the machine to a halt, usually with minimal damage to the airplane. EMAS bricks safely stopped a Boeing 747 and an MD-11 aircraft when they overran runways at New York’s JFK airport some years ago. With the paint on Executive airport’s new EMAS barely dry last January, the system was put to the test about 4 a.m. when a Falcon 20 cargo jet struck the barrier at the south end of the airport after it was unable to stop while attempting to land on runway 16. The aircraft was barely scratched and there were no injuries to either of the two pilots.

With the training for airport and local firefighting crews still fresh, emergency crews responded quickly with each element of the incident response working just as expected. The aircraft was pulled out of the barrier later that day to be made ready to fly again.

The EMAS system, while still serviceable, did require repairs in order to bring it back to 100 percent strength. That meant ordering replacement blocks and scheduling crews to handle the repairs. Of course Executive airport had no experience with the process of repairing the EMAS, which meant quite a bit of interaction with insurance companies, the FAA and EMAS creator Zodiac Aerospace. These interactions were precisely what the people in Japan wanted to hear more about.

Mr. Abbott said the FAA spoke first about why U.S. airports have runway safety areas (RSA) and how valuable a product like EMAS can be to airports that don’t have the real estate for a standard RSA, like Executive. “Then they turned it over to me to explain how and why we chose the product,” Abbott explained.

“I also spoke about how we paid for the EMAS and details about the construction process, as well as how to inspect the system and maintain it.” In all, about 50 people attended the Tokyo event that was presented to the audience mainly through a Japanese translator.

md-11-at-jfk

MD-11 rests in JFK EMAS bed

When asked why it was important enough to bring our Executive Director to Japan, Abbott said, “I think because our use of the EMAS barrier by that Falcon was such a textbook case. Everything worked just the way it was intended.” Abbott said there seemed to be tremendous benefits for the Japanese in the airport operator-to-airport operator kind of format used during the event.