Monthly Archives: February 2016

Could You Be the Next Chairman of the Airport Board?

Our HistoryWith last week’s departure of Airport Board Chairman Bob McKenzie, Wheeling Village President Dean Argiris along with Prospect Hts. Mayor Nick Helmer have wasted no time initiating a search for the right person to serve as the new Chairman.

The right person need not be a resident of either Wheeling or Prospect Hts., but qualified candidates from either municipality are encouraged to apply. Aviation experience is helpful, but not required. The Chairman is however, prohibited from holding any other position at Chicago Executive Airport in which they have a financial interest.

The Chairman presides over all Board meetings and takes part in all discussions on airport issues. The Chairman only casts a vote in order to break a tie. The position requires a time commitment to attend all monthly Board meetings, as well as a small number of workshop events, during each calendar year. The initial appointment is four years, with the option for a second four-year run.

The final selection and appointment of the new Chairman will be a joint decision of the Wheeling Village President and the Mayor of Prospect Hts.

Details for how to apply – a letter of interest and the applicant’s qualifications – are attached here.

The deadline to apply is March 15, 2016

99s Chicago Aviation Expo IFR/VFR Safety Seminar a Resounding Success

By Madeleine Monaco

DSC00560The Chicago Area Chapter 99s – the international organization of women pilots – ran another successful IFR/VFR Safety Seminar January 30th, drawing just over 300 local pilots and aviation enthusiasts. The 99s have been co-hosting the event at no cost to attendees since the late 70’s. In recent years the seminar’s co-sponsors were the FAA-DuPage FSDO, the FAASTeam and the Illinois Dept. of Transportation, Division of Aeronautics. As in the past, this year’s Annual Chicago Aviation Expo, IFR/VFR Safety Seminar required people to speak on a variety of useful and pertinent aviation topics that ran from 8:45 am until 3 pm in three large conference rooms at the Itasca Holiday Inn.

You may be aware that our great State of Illinois has been having a budget lockdown. This year, without a great deal of advance notice, our Chapter was told there would be no funding assistance. In previous years the hotel expenses were covered by the Division of Aeronautics. We decided as a Chapter to step in and provide the funding to continue the tradition. Our Chapter funded the entire Expo using vendor table sales, 50/50 raffle ticket sales and donations from supporters and attendees and managed to cover our costs and show a very small profit that went to our education fund.

The Expo also allows local and regional aviation vendors and organizations to present themselves in their best light to the many pilots present. This year’s vendors were: Aviation Universe, Avidyne, Inc, Chicago Flying Advisor, Chicagoland Glider CouncilCivil Air Patrol, DeKalb Taylor Municipal Airport, Foresters Financial, Fox Flying Club, FSX Flight School, Hilton Software/WingX Pro7, International Flying Club, Naperville Flying Club, Pipistrel USA / Soar Free LLC, Poplar Grove Airmotive, Recreational Aircraft Foundation, Rochelle Avionics, Savant Capital and Stick and Rudder LLC. The hotel provides coffee and pastries in the morning and a buffet lunch mid-day.DSC00530

In the absence of our Chair, Ellen O’Hara, Madeleine Monaco agreed to take charge of this project, acting as liaison and worked closely with Carol Para of the Division of Aeronautics who had chaired the event the past several years. The working team included Leslie Prellwitz as Vendor Table Sales Chair/Manager; Rita Adams and Diane Cozzi as registration and front of house managers; Jill Mann and Deanna Close as Flying Companion instructors, and Natalie Berman as 50/50 Raffle ticket seller.

We had good weather and the vendors were set to go when pilots and companions started flooding our space in the morning. The first session was a joint event, beginning at 8:45, introducing the sponsors, explaining the FAA Wings credits and getting the day going. The audience gave the 99s a standing ovation when told the chapter had funded the event in full.

Here’s a look at this year’s safety sessions.

IFR

IFR Charts and Procedures, Part 1 & 2 by Jason Unger, Chief Pilot/CFII Fly There LLC

Spatial Disorientation by Dr David Schall, FAA Regional Flight Surgeon

ARTCC Operations, Part 1 & 2 by Guy Lieser & Steve McGreevy, Chicago Center

DSC00545VFR

Avoiding Class B Airspace Incursions by Lou Wipotnik, the 1996 FAA Flight Instructor of the Year & Nicole Sparger & Aaron Barclay of NATCA’s Bridge the Gap Program

Crosswind Landings Perfected by Alan Zielinski, Designated Pilot Examiner

Aviation Weather Impacts to the National Airspace by Kevin Fryar, Meteorologist-in-charge ARR

Loss of Control: The Stabilized Approach & Go Around by Carolyn Remol, FAASTeam Program Manager Ret

Your Next Flight Review,Next Rating or License by Dave Klopfleisch, CFI ChIcago Executive Flight School

Flying Companions/Aspiring Pilots, presented by 99s Deanna Close and Jill Mann

Why Does it Fly?

Aviation Charts

Helping Your Pilot & Dealing with Emergencies

Planning A Trip 

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What your e-mail later this year for updates on the 2017 Chicago Aviation Expo

EMAS: It Just Works

EMAS FalconIt seems as if it was just a few months ago that we published a story explaining that the airport’s new engineered materials arresting system (EMAS) was operational.

Actually, come to think of it, we did just write that story in November, explaining the safety benefits of a new EMAS now stationed at each end of the long, essentially north to south, runway 16/34.

The EMAS was installed after the FAA published a requirement for a safety barrier at each end of the runway at most airports. Unfortunately, Chicago Executive airport is land-locked with no extra open space to simply lay down an extra 1,000 feet of concrete at each end, of the runway to create that barrier, known as a Runway Safety Area. EMAS was the next best option.

In the early morning hours of January 26, just three months after the final EMAS work was completed, a Falcon jet pilot had trouble stopping his aircraft as he landed to the south from over Wheeling.

As the pilot approached the crushable EMAS blocks at the south end of the airport near Palatine Rd., the barrier performed precisely as it was designed. The blocks began to crumble under the weight of the 20,000 lbs. airplane and halted the aircraft in about 150 feet, preventing it from entering nearby Palatine Road. Neither of the two pilots was injured and damage to the aircraft was minimal. The aircraft has since flown out of the airport and back to its home base in Michigan. The reason the pilot was unable to stop is still under investigation by the FAA.EMAS still

What’s really important about this story though is that the EMAS worked perfectly in January and brought the airplane to a safe stop with only minor damage. While an EMAS installation is not cheap, the Falcon pilots, as well as everyone in the community can rest easier knowing that the large aircraft that use runway 16/34 can indeed be stopped within the airport boundary in an emergency. Until repairs – estimated to cost about $396,000 – the barrier is still operational, except for the few blocks damaged by the Falcon that were removed. And in case you’re wondering, the airport doesn’t have to pay for the repairs. That bill gets sent to the insurance company of the Falcon’s operator.

Other business aviation airports that also thought ahead enough to install EMAS include, Greenville Downtown SC, Hyannis Barnstable MA. Dutchess County NY, Teterboro NJ, St.Paul Downtown MN, Kansas City Downtown MO, Newcastle Wilmington DE, Telluride CO, Martin County MD, Republic airport NY, Groton New London CT, Cleveland Burke Lakefront OH, Addison TX, and Monterey CA.